Entrepreneurship 101 (Part 3)

Summary In the final session on entrepreneurship, Tessa Conroy, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics at UW–Madison and Community Economic Development Specialist, discusses “how to build an entrepreneurial ecosystem”. Webinar Recording Additional Materials Entrepreneurship 101, Part 3, PowerPoint Explore Our Lunch-n-Learn Series

Entrepreneurship 101 (Part 2)

Summary In part two of a three-part series on entrepreneurship, Tessa Conroy, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics at UW–Madison and Community Economic Development Specialist, discusses the “what” of entrepreneurship in economic development. Webinar Recording Additional Materials Entrepreneurship 101, Part 2, PowerPoint Explore Our Lunch-n-Learn Series

Entrepreneurship 101 (Part 1)

Summary In part one of a three-part series on entrepreneurship, Tessa Conroy, Assistant Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics at UW–Madison and Community Economic Development Specialist, discusses the “why” of entrepreneurship in economic development. Webinar Recording Additional Materials Entrepreneurship 101, Part 1, PowerPoint Explore Our Lunch-n-Learn Series

WIndicators Volume 4, Number 2: Nonemployer Businesses & Diversity

Nonemployer establishments, sole proprietorships and partnerships without any paid employees, are an important part of the country’s economy. As of 2018, they made up a large and quickly growing share of businesses in the United States at 77% of the total while the other 23% of establishments were employer businesses [1]. Given that nonemployer establishments are businesses without employees, they are predominantly independent contractors who work for themselves or small businesses operated only by the owner(s) or unpaid members of their family.

WIndicators Volume 1, Number 2: Minority Business Owners and the Wisconsin Economy

The importance of small business development and entrepreneurship to the future health of the economy is becoming more widely understood and accepted across Wisconsin. Wisconsin focused research (Conroy and Deller 2015a) has documented that nearly all of the net job growth (expansions minus contractions) comes from start-up businesses, which tend to be small. Since 2005 […]

Slow Churn: Declining Dynamism in America’s Dairyland

Since the start of the Great Recession, the death rate of Wisconsin businesses with employees (i.e. employer businesses) has outpaced the startup rate. As a result, after almost three decades of growth, the number of businesses with employees in Wisconsin started to decline in 2007. New employer businesses are a critical source of job creation. […]

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